Former coal CEO Robert Murray files for black lung benefits

FILE - Robert Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah on Monday, Aug. 20, 2007. A published report says Murray has filed an application with the U.S. Department of Labor for black lung benefits. Ohio Valley ReSource reports the former head of Murray Energy said on the form that he is still board chairman of the company but can no longer serve as president and CEO due to his health. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
FILE - Robert Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah on Monday, Aug. 20, 2007. A published report says Murray has filed an application with the U.S. Department of Labor for black lung benefits. Ohio Valley ReSource reports the former head of Murray Energy said on the form that he is still board chairman of the company but can no longer serve as president and CEO due to his health. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) (AP2007)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Former coal CEO Robert E. Murray, who has fought federal regulations on the industry, has filed an application with the U.S. Department of Labor for black lung benefits, according to a published report.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting and Ohio Valley ReSource report the former head of Murray Energy said on the form that he is still board chairman of the company but can no longer serve as president and CEO due to his health.

Murray has fought federal mine safety regulations for years. His company filed an unsuccessful lawsuit in 2014 over regulations to cut the amount of coal dust in coal mines to reduce the incidence of black lung disease, saying they were overly burdensome and costly to the industry.

In the black lung claim, Murray, 80, says he is heavily dependent on oxygen and is “near death.”

Murray Energy Holdings emerged last month from federal bankruptcy protection under a new name and ownership group.

The new company, St. Clairsville, Ohio-based American Consolidated Natural Resources Inc., is the largest privately owned U.S. coal operator with active mines in Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia and Utah.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting and Ohio Valley ReSource confirmed the authenticity of Murray’s claim documents by entering his last name, birthdate and a case ID number into an online portal maintained by the Labor Department. If the claim goes before an administrative law judge, some parts would become public.

Murray says in the claim that he worked underground while supervising operations for several years.