Tesla says cars can automatically stop for traffic lights

FILE - This Wednesday, March 18, 2020, file photo, shows a Tesla charging station for automobiles in Port Huron, Mich. Tesla's sales of its increasingly popular electric cars got off to a fast start in the year, even though the company had to slam the brakes along with other major automakers in March 2020 because of worldwide efforts to contain the worst pandemic in a century. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
FILE - This Wednesday, March 18, 2020, file photo, shows a Tesla charging station for automobiles in Port Huron, Mich. Tesla's sales of its increasingly popular electric cars got off to a fast start in the year, even though the company had to slam the brakes along with other major automakers in March 2020 because of worldwide efforts to contain the worst pandemic in a century. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

DETROIT – After testing on public roads, Tesla is rolling out a new feature of its partially automated driving system designed to spot stop signs and traffic signals.

The update of the electric car company’s cruise control and auto-steer systems is a step toward CEO Elon Musk’s pledge to convert cars to fully self-driving vehicles later this year.

But it also runs contrary to recommendations from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board that include limiting where Tesla’s Autopilot driving system can operate because it has failed to spot and react to hazards in at least three fatal crashes.

In a note sent to a group of Tesla owners who were picked to test the stop light and sign recognition feature, the company said it can be used with the Traffic Aware Cruise Control or Autosteer systems. The feature will slow the car whenever it detects a traffic light, including those that are green or blinking yellow. It will notify the driver of its intent to slow down and stop, and drivers must push down the gear selector and press the accelerator pedal to confirm that it’s safe to proceed.

The company warns in the note obtained by The Associated Press that drivers must pay attention and be ready to take immediate action “including braking because this feature may not stop for all traffic controls.”

The note says that over time, as the system learns from the fleet on the roads, it “will control more naturally.”

Tesla didn’t respond to multiple requests for additional details, but the website Electrek.co reported last week that the new feature is being sent to the wider Tesla fleet as part of an over-the-Internet software update for thousands of vehicles. The feature won’t come until later in other parts of the world, the website said.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the U.S. government’s road safety agency, said in a prepared statement Monday that the agency “will closely monitor the performance of this technology,” adding that drivers must be ready to act and law enforcement agencies will hold them responsible.