Apollo 50th anniversary: A look at what's on display at Space Center Houston

By Rose-Ann Aragon - Reporter

HOUSTON - Space Center Houston is the place to celebrate Apollo 11 and the entire Apollo program.

KPRC2 sat down with CEO William T. Harris to find out what visitors will see and experience.

The entire world watched as Space City played a major role in landing men on the moon and now, people from around the world want to celebrate the landing 50 years later.

"Be prepared for crowds we will have a lot of people here. We were starting to receive phone calls last year from people saying, 'I've already booked my hotel; we don't know what you have planned but we want to be here for the anniversary,'" Harris said.

For more stories, photos, videos, bios and a timeline of the Apollo 50th anniversary, visit the special section on our website.

Space Center Houston will be a prime destination for the celebration, giving visitors a chance to see lunar artifacts up close.

Here are some of those artifacts:

Moon rocks - The rocks at the vault include an actual moon rock that you can touch. It's one of only eight touchstones in the world.

KPRC2

Moon rocks inside the vault at Johnson Space Center.

Lunar vaults - At the lunar vault, you can see the largest collection of rocks, core samples, sand and dust from the moon's surface.

The vault at Johnson Space Center.

Lunar roving vehicle - The lunar roving vehicle trainer. Astronauts used it to prepare for Apollo 15, 16 and 17. It's currently on display.

KPRC2

A lunar roving vehicle trainer at Johnson Space Center.

Pete Conrad's spacesuit - Commander Conrad's spacesuit that was worn during his lunar walk is on display. It still has moon dust on it.

KPRC2

The space suit that was worn by Pete Conrad at Johnson Space Center.

Apollo 17 command module - The Apollo 17 command module named "America," is on display. It's the capsule that was used in the final lunar mission in 1972. It was the last time humans traveled to and walked on the moon.

KPRC2

The command module from Apollo 17 at Johnson Space Center.

Copyright 2019 by KPRC Click2Houston - All rights reserved.