HOUSTON -

Failing grades and being held back in school are just some of the issues families of children with dyslexia are dealing with. However, a recently FDA approved tool is changing that.

Cade Taylor, 12, of northwest Houston has always struggled with reading.

He explained, "The words were bouncing, going in waves, all blurry."

His mother Amy added, "His attention span was just not there and they thought he was ADHD. They tested him for that. He was fine. But I guess he couldn't concentrate or couldn't read."

Houston optometrist Dr. Angela Marcaccio with Texas State Optical Museum District introduced Cade to the ChromaGen lenses.

Cade told Local 2, "I can read faster, better and I can read longer words now."

Dr. Marcaccio explained, " It does not work for the dyslexic that flips the letters or they are mirrored. This is more the movement type of dyslexia."

Dr. Marcaccio selects from 16 different colored lens filters which correct the visual reading disorder often described as, one eye sees faster than the other.

Dr. Marcaccio explained, "So you see the words printed, sending it to the brain. So the right eye might be going 50 miles an hour. The left eye may be going 20 miles an hour, so it's not in sync."

Episcopal High School senior Hannah Luedke said before using the lenses, reading made her dizzy and nauseous.

But now she said, "My grades have definitely improved a ton and it's not like I'm asking constantly my teacher, 'Can you slow down a bit or can we go over this again?'"

Amy Taylor said, "I would definitely say it was the best investment I made for my child."

Dr. Marcaccio added, "It's making a big difference in these kids. They're in slow learners classes. Sometimes they're held back in school and then if this works, it just changes their whole life. They're not labeled."

ChromaGen has a simple survey online to find out if you might be a good candidate for the lenses.

The ChromaGen Lenses cost about $800 to $900. Currently, the cost is not covered by insurance.