CYPRESS, Texas -

Documents obtained by Local 2 Investigates are providing a clearer picture as to when students on the Lone Star College System's Cy-Fair campus were alerted to a man attacking students during an April 9 incident.

On the day of the attack, Local 2 received complaints from some students who said they did not receive security alerts from the campus in a timely manner.

Following an evacuation of the campus, Senior Vice Chancellor Rand Key told reporters during a news conference that security alerts were sent "immediately," but declined to talk specifics.

Documents provided by the Lone Star system through a Freedom of Information Act request now show the campus did not send out alerts to students until 41 minutes after the first call for help.

Harris County Sheriff's officials said the first call to 911 was received at 11:12 a.m. and campus police said they were first notified at 11:13 a.m.

Campus officials stated the man suspected of carrying out the attack, Dylan Quick, was arrested at 11:17 a.m., the same time Cy-Fair EMS reported being notified of the injuries.

Lone Star records show a security alert was sent to students starting at 11:53 a.m. and that process was completed at 11:59 a.m.

Officials with the Lone Star system declined Local 2's request for an on-camera interview or to provide a written statement regarding this timeline.

However, Lone Star spokesman Chad Young said there was a lot of confusion the day of the attacks, and the school's first priority was to respond to the threat and tend to the 14 injured students.

Young said even after Quick had been arrested, campus officials received word of a possible second suspect still on campus.

However, Young said he could not provide specifics as to when campus officials learned of a possible second suspect and when they learned no such second suspect existed.

The Lone Star system faced similar questions following a January shooting at the North Harris campus. At that time, students complained of similar delays in receiving security alerts and campus officials promised to work to improve the system.