HOUSTON -

What may look like a full moon Friday night may pale in comparison to Saturday night's "Super Moon."

Dr. Carolyn Sumner, Vice President of Astronomy and Physics at the Houston Museum of Natural Science says several astronomical elements come together to make what will be a special night.

“This is called a perigee and a syzvgy,” She said.

“A perigee, that's the moon's closest point in its orbit around the earth. Syzvgy, a direct line between the earth, the sun and the moon on the other side and they occur within one minute of each other between 10:34 and 10:35 tomorrow night.”

The Super Moon is also known as a Flower moon or Milk moon.

By whatever name, Dr. Sumner says Saturday night's show will be quite impressive.

“It's going to be about 14 percent bigger. Just bigger! And it's going to be maybe as much as 30 percent brighter depending on how you compare it,” she said. “It hasn't been this bright for over a year and it really is the time to go out and have a special event with your kids.”

The classroom of the Museum of Natural Science will move outside Saturday night to take in the very special view.

“We're going to have a special at our George Observatory," Sumner said. “Everybody needs to come out to Brazos Bend State Park. We're also going to look at three planets, Venus, Mars and Saturn and we're going to do Cinco de Mayo and Mayan prophecies in our domed theater out there.”

Sumner says there is one more benefit of Saturday's Super Moon.

"With all that extra light that big full moon you don't have to worry about the alligators as much!”