HOUSTON -

We've got another day of brutally hot temperatures as Houston climbs to 102 degrees, College Station 104 degrees and Galveston 98 degrees. Galveston has broken high-temperature record two days in a row. More incredible is that the records had been in place since 1875 -- that's 137 years. Tuesday's record for the Island is 95 degrees, and I'm expecting 98 degrees. That would also break the record from 1875. This is also fascinating: In 140 year of record keeping, Galveston had never reached a 100-degree temperature in the month of June. The reason we are setting records like these in Galveston is we have northerly winds bringing dry air to the Island. Dry air is easier to heat up and the north wind is blocking the sea breeze.

Houston IAH and Hobby airports both reached 102 degrees on Monday, the first 100-degree days of the year. We still aren't as hot as last year's summer drought. Last June, we reached the triple digits seven days in the month of June. After Wednesday, the ridge of high pressure that's brought in the heat breaks down a little so the temperatures will drop and the humidity will come back up.

Here is a list of the most 100-degree days in the month of June. We may get to three this year.

  • 10 days: 1902
  • 8 days: 1980
  • 7 days: 2009, 2011
  • 4 days: 1906
  • 2 days: 1998, 1934, 1930, 1911

There is a 20 percent chance of getting a strong and possibly severe thunderstorm Tuesday afternoon, but it would be isolated. Most of us will bake in the heat.

Warning signs for heat stroke:

  • Not sweating
  • Collapsing
  • Becoming incoherent
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Body Temperature of 106 degrees or higher
  • Seizure

People who exhibit signs of heat stroke should do the following:

  • Call 911
  • Get out of the sun and go indoors or to a shady area
  • Cool with water, but not ice water
  • If someone is seizing, protect them from injury, but do not put anything in their mouth

There are several steps that can be taken to prevent heat-related injuries:

  • Drink plenty of cool water or other non-carbonated drinks
  • Take breaks about every hour and get out of the sun and cool down for at least 10 minutes
  • Wear hats, sunglasses and cotton or other natural fiber clothing
  • Use sunscreen to protect uncovered skin
  • If drinking sports drinks, cut them 50/50 with cold water
  • Do not use salt tablets -- drink sports drinks to replenish electrolytes

People who exhibit signs of a heat-related illness should do the following:

  • Get out of the sun and cool down
  • Sip cool water or 50 percent water/sports drink
  • Rest for at least 30 minutes after the symptoms end
  • Limit activity in the sun for the rest of the day
  • For chest pain or shortness of breath, call 911

Pets can suffer heat-related problems, too. Make sure they always have clean, fresh water available and access to shade or the indoors.

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